Three Crosses on a Hill

It is a chilly afternoon in early April.  The wind is briskly blowing over the rocky hillside.  A small squad of soldiers, having just completed their assigned tasks, huddle around a small fire to rest. The gruesome duties which they fulfilled, though cruel in the eyes of many, are just routine actions for this experienced team of men.  Even as their three prisoners moan and scream in agony and the bystanders gather to jeer or cry all around them; the soldiers can casually joke and enjoy the company of one another because this is just like every other day in their everyday lives.

As for the three men that they had just nailed and suspended onto three blood stained crosses, the day was anything but routine.  It was a day unlike any other.  A single day filled with so much unimaginable pain and humiliation that it seemed to last for an eternity.  Only to culminate into  one final massive physical trauma of being impaled onto a wooden beam, lifted and secured to another in the shape of a cross displayed in a public place so that each man was forced to suffer mental anguish as well.  They were left to their own mental torture as to ponder their unique existence while excruciatingly balancing their spiritual future on the remainder of the last day of their earthly existence.   

One of them was not satisfied to suffer alone.  He joined in the torment of one the three.

One of the criminals who were hanged there was hurling abuse at Him, saying,

“Are You not the Christ? Save Yourself and us!”

But the other answered, and rebuking him saying,

“Do you not even fear God, since you are under the same sentence of condemnation? We indeed are suffering justly, for we are receiving what we deserve for our deeds; but this man has done nothing wrong.”

“Jesus, remember me when You come in Your kingdom!”

Jesus said to him, “Truly I say to you, today you shall be with Me in Paradise.”

This passage fully describes the life embodiment of the three solutions to every problem.  The criminal who taunted Jesus represents those of us who intentionally make the wrong choices.  Jesus, on the other hand, validates the exact opposite by setting the example that it is always possible to make the right choices in life.  And finally, the repentant thief, is the person who goes through life choosing the acceptable concessions.

Criminal one, is portrayed as some one who lacks empathy and has no fear of retribution; even as he suffers the ultimate penalty for utter selfishness.  It is clear that he and the other criminal were partners in crime.  They were caught stealing, likely from the Roman government or from a high-ranking Roman official, evidenced by their death sentence.  Theft from a regular citizen would have resulted in the loss of a hand not the loss of life.  This case is what became known as a Capital Crime. 

As we analyze the comments that the second criminal makes to his buddy, we can assume that he lived a life filled with regret from the decisions he made.  He was likely someone who would be referred to as a follower.  He knew the decisions he made were wrong but he did them anyway and probably without total commitment to his actions.  If left to his own accord in the decision-making process, he would spend a little more time in deciding his actions, weighing the right choice from the wrong and would probably land on the choice of an acceptable concession; always closer to the wrong choice.  In other words, he probably was a good man who followed the wrong people.

The example of Jesus, from a Christian’s perspective, is clearly a man who made the right choices and was willing to endure the consequences of his decision.  If you believe that he was true man, then he experiences hurt, suffering and pain like all of us.  If you also believe He is true God, then you believe He could have avoided all this pain just by willing it so.  This is what make the story of Good Friday so remarkable. 

The story of an innocent man standing for the truth even when that single decision will get him killed.  For three years, the Jewish leaders squabbled over the truths Jesus was sharing with their followers. Many of them secretly believed these truths but their livelihoods and social status required that they rebuke the truth.  It was their selfish reasons that ultimately cost him his life.  When he was directly asked if he was the Son of God, he told the court the complete truth.  “I am!”  These two words were told to Moses two thousand years before; when kneeling in the presence of God asked, “What should I call you? God replied, “I am who I am.”  In three days, their selfish lies would be exposed to the world.  

Anthony “Tony” Boquet, the author of “The Bloodline of Wisdom, The Awakening of a Modern Solutionary”

If this is my last post, I want all to know there was only one purpose for all that I have written; to have made a positive difference in the lives of others.

The Annunciation; the Feast of Free Will

If you are a Christian of any denomination, the ancestors of your faith followed the belief that a virgin girl of twelve to thirteen years of age, was asked by an angel if she would allow herself to become the mother of the son of God.  A pretty hefty ask of anyone; much less from someone who would be considered a child today but two thousand years ago she would have been viewed as a woman, since she reached what was considered then the age of reason; twelve years of age.

Today Christians worldwide celebrate that special day because her miraculous offspring, by historical accounts, ended up changing the path of mankind forever.  From a solely human perspective, this single decision laid the first stone for man’s relationship to family tree of God.  Without Mary’s consent, Jesus would have not been born and countless prophecies would never have been fulfilled.  That single, yes answer was unquestionably the single most impactful answer ever given by any one person in all of history.  

Think about the ramifications of your person decisions. 

When you make big decisions, do you spend time procrastinating? 

If you make a mistake; you say no when you should have said yes.  Do the negative outcomes haunt you? 

Mary was just a poor girl who lived a righteous life.  She was faithful and tried to live a life reflective of her Jewish beliefs but that can be said us many people, then or today.  What sets her apart from others was the depth of her faith and the belief that by doing God’s will everything would be fine.  

From God’s perspective, He shows us that we are not forced to do anything.  Mary could have said no to the angel.  At the time, she was engaged to be married; she was planning her life, minding her own business.  You could say that God shared His will with her and she accepted His path over her own. 

Do we have enough faith to do that? 

God nudges us many times in our life, showing us the direction that He wants us to go, but we don’t always accept His nudge.  We have our own plans. 

What miracles could we be apart of, if we followed Mary’s example?  

We all have free will, and God respects it completely…He understands; created us to use it.

The rest of this article is compliments of the website, http://www.churchyear.net/.  If you enjoy history, check this out.  

The Feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary dates back to at least the 6th century, and is mentioned between AD 530 and 533 in a sermon by Abraham of Ephesus.  It was adopted worldwide through the Trullan Synod (AD 692) that speaks of the Annunciation feast as universally celebrated in the Catholic Church.  

The oldest observance of the day is on March 25, although in Spain the feast was at times celebrated on December 19 to avoid any chance of the date falling during the Lenten season. March 25 is obviously 9 months before Christmas, the birth of Jesus. Scholars are not completely sure whether the date of the Annunciation influenced the date of Christmas, or vice-versa. Before the Church adopted fixed days of celebration, early Christians speculated on the dates of major events in Jesus’ life. Second-century Latin Christians in Rome and North Africa tried to find the day in which Jesus died. By the time of Tertullian (d. AD 225) they had concluded that he died on Friday, March 25, AD 29 (incidentally, this is an impossibility, since March 25 in the year AD 29 was not a Friday). How does the day of Jesus’ death relate to the day of his conception? It comes from the Jewish concept of the “integral age” of the great Jewish prophets. This is the notion that the prophets of Israel died on the same dates as their birth or conception. Therefore, if Jesus died on March 25, he was also conceived that day. The pseudo-(John)Chrysostomic work de solstitia et aequinoctia conceptionis et nativitatis nostri Iesu Christi et Iohannis Baptistae accepts the same calculation. St. Augustine mentions it as well. Other ancient Christians believed Jesus was conceived on March 25th for another reason: they believed (based on Jewish calculations of the period) that the creation of the world occurred that day. Thus, it was fitting that the one who makes us new creations was conceived on the day the world was created.

Anthony “Tony” Boquet, the author of “The Bloodline of Wisdom, The Awakening of a Modern Solutionary”

If this is my last post, I want all to know there was only one purpose for all that I have written; to have made a positive difference in the lives of others.

Three States of Formative Change

Decide to make the jump!

We all go through changes in our lives.  Some of these changes are subtle, so subtle that we don’t even notice them our self.  The funny thing is that when we do notice the change sometimes, we find we had no control over it. We changed but not because of anything of our own doing.  This type of change is usually not lasting or sustainable.     

Whether controlled or uncontrolled, people do change and when they intentionally change for the betterment of others as well as themselves it is usually permanent.  This is the type of change that can elevate us into the three various states of formative change.  Thanks to the Power of the Wisdom of Three we can easily remember, understand and teach these to the people who mean the most to us.  As a leader of people, you can only foster change in others; you can never change them yourself. 

The first state we go through is Transformation.  By definition, we slowly change in composition or structure; slowly changing our outward appearance.  This sort of change can be considered natural, occurring as part of normal growth or it can be controlled with our help.  With the latter, we might spend numerous hours in a gym to get in better shape, read countless books to become smarter or increase our attention to the three areas of stewardship in order to improve your spiritual nature.  Any of these are noticeable and beneficial.

Once we have been transformed, we can “choose” to proceed to a state of Transfiguration.  The big differentiator between someone being transformed verses being transfigured is that you literally change right before the eyes of the people you deal with.  When we are transfigured, everyone can and does take notice.  You stand out from the crowd in a very positive way but usually for short periods of time.  To be transfigured means that those who know us best might not recognize our changed thoughts, words or action as they pertain to our routine self but they can readily attest to the changes they see.  These transfigured people are just average people who, out of nowhere, say what needs to be said or do remarkable deeds when they need to happen.  This stage of change requires a selfless loving heart so as to push away the normal fear that accompanies all change.      

The third state usually has the most radical and lasting change because it deals with totality of our physical, mental and spiritual self; it is Transubstantiation.  This is when our body, mind and soul are observed as a united being while at the same time our thoughts, words and deeds belong to the spiritual essence of our Creator.  We can all accept that we are human but that is not good enough; we are called to transcend into being the best human we can be.  To make this change requires the aid and grace of our Creator; we cannot do this alone.  Transubstantiation can only occur when our body, mind and soul are unified at the highest level possible.  People will perceive us a normal person doing holy actions created through loving thoughts, words and deeds.  When a person is one with the Creator, they are transubstantiated with Him.

“He lives in them and they in Him.”          

Anthony “Tony” Boquet, the author of “The Bloodline of Wisdom, The Awakening of a Modern Solutionary” If this is my last post, I want all to know there was only one purpose for all that I have written; to have made a positive difference in the lives of others.

The Trinities and The Sign of the Cross

Today is Trinity Sunday in the Christian faith.  As many of you know, I am a practicing Catholic who enjoys sharing the why behind the what.  The “what” of this week has to do with my favorite number, the number three and, more specifically; the Holy Trinity, the human trinity, the three human actions and the sign of the cross.

The sign of the cross in the Roman Catholic Church is much more than just an act that we do in remembrance of Jesus’ ultimate sacrifice for the world.  It is really an amazing prayer with much meaning.  Continue reading “The Trinities and The Sign of the Cross”

Faith in the Leadership; Professing is not Enough

solutionWhen you leader others, you want them; no you need them to have faith in your thoughts, words, and deeds. If they do not have that faith, they will falter when things get tough, or worst, they will seek out another leader whom they perceive will better fit their needs. For the leaders of companies, organizations, or even families this lack of retention can be a very big problem. Continue reading “Faith in the Leadership; Professing is not Enough”

Our Three Final Wise Decisions

“There are only three certainties in life; breathing, taxes, and death.”

Anthony “Tony” Boquet

It was Ben Franklin who coined the phrase, “There are but two certainties in life; death and taxes.”   Now realize that this statement was made as a jab of the ever growing need to fund the government machine but he was absolutely right in the fact that taxes will last as long as we live and death is a certain end to our life.  However, in an effort to satisfy my craving for accuracy, I purpose a third certainty; the only sustaining involuntary function that maintains life; breathing.  We know that Ben was a fan of debates and was also a very intelligent man.  I think that if he and I could have reflected together on this comment, he would have agreed that I was correct in my addition.  Man only needs three things for human life; Air, Water and Food.  Of the three it is only air that is consumed involuntarily; thus there can be no life without the act of breathing.

Continue reading “Our Three Final Wise Decisions”