A Story Meant to Changed the World

 A little over two thousand years ago a story packed with examples of the Power of the Wisdom on Three was told as an answer to a simple four word question; “Who is my neighbor?”  This question was posed as a clarifying point to a spiritual law; one of the natural laws of civilized societies.  In Christian circles the law is called the First Commandment.  To philosophers and solutionaries it is called the Trinity of Selfless Love.  Simply stated, in order to live a peace filled existence one must love their God with their whole mind, body and soul; and love their neighbor as their self.

The story that was told in reply to that question is solely responsible for countless societal changes throughout the centuries. Today, if we were to see someone lying, hurt in the street, our first action would be to call 911.  That one action would put into motion a flood of goodwill that did not exist at the time of the original narrative. First responders, hospitals, insurance, orphanages, soup kitchens, homeless shelter and many other services were all a direct creation of the premise taught in that short tale.  We should each care for those who are in need of physical help but the story uncovers many deeper societal injuries as well.

The audience were the residents of a wealthy and prominent city of the time.  The setting was one of the entry ways into the city; a well traveled, yet prone to violence, thoroughfare.  One of the main characters of the story was a man who was robbed, brutally attacked and left for dead on the roadway.  The first two people who happened to pass the crime scene did nothing to help the man, thinking he was already dead.  These two people were described as holy people and due to the religious customs of the times, they were not to touch dead bodies at the risk of becoming “unclean”.  In other words, to the listeners, the two bystanders would have been justified, doing nothing wrong by just walking around the man laying in the street.  The third character was identified as a Samaritan, an outsider, a person from a neighboring town inhabited by people who were looked down upon because of their differing beliefs.  Of all people, it was the Samaritan who stopped and found the man to be alive. He cared for his wounds the best he could, physically carried him to an Inn, stayed with him over night, arranged and paid for the follow up care for this total stranger while making sure that any further bills would be paid if more were outstanding.  Then to end the story, this accomplished storyteller, wanting the audience to think, ended the parable with another question; “Who was neighbor to the beaten man?”

We each are called to love one another.  Not only when people agree with our beliefs.  Not only when they follow the letter of the “law”. That is what makes this story eternally relevant.  We can see ourselves in each character.  No more superior than any and possibly equally as guilty of ignoring the law of love. 

Would our world be a much better place if we all strove to be a good Samaritan to every neighbor we encounter?        

Anthony “Tony” Boquet, the author of “The Bloodline of Wisdom, The Awakening of a Modern Solutionary” If this is my last post, I want all to know there was only one purpose for all that I have written; to have made a positive difference in the lives of others.

The Highest Levels of Humanity

Humanity is more than just being born of the human species.  It is a level of existence that no other creature can take part in yet sometimes its greatness is taken for granted by those born into it.   Think of it as connecting our individual selves to one other so as to enrich society through our personal growth of talents, skills and abilities. It is like being pieces of a puzzle; you know you belong in the picture but you are not quite sure where or how you fit.

It can be an overwhelming undertaking since no one is born having already reaching their true potential.  In order to reach our full potential we must rely on and then use the guidance offered by the natural laws.  These constant truths are the rules and life lessons that must be adhered to and mastered regardless of who we are.  Every human is born equal yet unique and can participate in the benefits of following these natural laws if they so choose but it is not required nor is it easy.

The reasons we do not choose to follow the truths of humanity and the consequences associated with it can be made clear by one of these laws.  The Law of Poor Behavior says that the human reality toward the poor handling of the truth can be explained in three ways.

  1. We can accidentally choose wisely without knowing the truth.
  2. We can be completely mistaken about the truth but still arrive at the truth through the unforeseen consequences of our past decisions.  
  3. We can know the truth but choose to ignore it completely for our own selfish reasons.

On the positive side, when we choose to embrace the truths of humanity, The Law of Developmental Growth outlines the process very simply.   The law states that no physical, spiritual or mental growth can take place without first being tested at a higher and usually uncomfortable level of endurance and passing the test.  In other words, to get better we must first step outside our normal comfort zone.  Physically, muscles have to be stretched; mentally, minds must be challenged with new ideas and spiritually we have to grow to new heights of love and understanding.  A meaningful life experience can only occur through the constant repeating of the growth cycle; moving from content, to uneasy, to success; driving us to a higher level of comfort.  By dying to our old ways, we can reach this new level of contentment which brings us back to the beginning and the cycle starts all over again.   

From the very moment of conception our cells are brought to their limits before dividing into new cells.  After nine months from the birth of conception, the comfortable infant is physically forced to leave the safety and comfort of the mother’s womb to be thrust into a whole new scary second birth.  This experience is so intense, experts say that it is good that the child does not have the mental awareness to understand what is happening.   You could say, our birth is the first of many very traumatic life cycles. Each cycle has a birth, growth and a death. The cycle of life.  

From that moment on the baby will begin the journey of thousands of such cycles.  It will be born, grow and die multiple times and in countless ways.  As this new person develops their three personas, he or she will need to experience repeated discomfort and forced growth before reaching a new and more comfortable existence.  In school the student will be born again into a new grades of education where new curricula will be presented.  For the student to excel they will have to endure hours of study and pass repeated testing before reaching the next and harder level of advancement. 

When we become adults our learning methods change but they never stop.  In all aspects of our lives we will be challenge by the choices we make.  If we do well and make the right choices we develop into a higher level of comfort.  If we slack and make poor choices, we remain at the same level of existence or worse, we decline into a state of suffering.  The better our choices, the more that we challenge our self and the more vested we become in our positive improvement; the higher our growth and development will be. 

After living the life we have crafted, another cycle will end and a new one will begin.  Most people who believe in the natural laws, also believe in a life continuance after death.  It is believed that the level of comfort we will experience in our next plane of existence will depend greatly on the amount of effort we put forth during our earthly life.  It make sense, as it follows the decree of all natural laws, we are each given a present, a past and a future.  What we make of our future depends on what we learned from the past and how we apply the lessons in our present.        

Anthony “Tony” Boquet, the author of “The Bloodline of Wisdom, The Awakening of a Modern Solutionary”

If this is my last post, I want all to know there was only one purpose for all that I have written; to have made a positive difference in the lives of others. 

Heroes & Heroines; Solutionaries in Our Times of Need

Do we still have true heroes?  

Does the definition change as society changes?  

These are a couple of thought-provoking questions which were recently posed to me in a meeting that I attended. The discussion that followed was riveting and caused me to reflect more fully on the topic as it relates to moral and ethical changes of a society.

Heroes, in the simplest term, are a group of people.  To answer questions about any group, we first must try to understand the meanings of the title used to describe them.     Continue reading “Heroes & Heroines; Solutionaries in Our Times of Need”